Authentic, Original, and Valuable: Stabilizing the Genetic Identity in Non-human and Human Populations in Finland

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Authentic, Original, and Valuable : Stabilizing the Genetic Identity in Non-human and Human Populations in Finland. / Tupasela, Aaro Mikael; Tamminen, Sakari.

In: Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, Vol. 15, No. 3, 2015, p. 411-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Tupasela, AM & Tamminen, S 2015, 'Authentic, Original, and Valuable: Stabilizing the Genetic Identity in Non-human and Human Populations in Finland', Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 411-431. https://doi.org/10.1111/sena.12163

APA

Tupasela, A. M., & Tamminen, S. (2015). Authentic, Original, and Valuable: Stabilizing the Genetic Identity in Non-human and Human Populations in Finland. Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism, 15(3), 411-431. https://doi.org/10.1111/sena.12163

Vancouver

Tupasela AM, Tamminen S. Authentic, Original, and Valuable: Stabilizing the Genetic Identity in Non-human and Human Populations in Finland. Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism. 2015;15(3):411-431. https://doi.org/10.1111/sena.12163

Author

Tupasela, Aaro Mikael ; Tamminen, Sakari. / Authentic, Original, and Valuable : Stabilizing the Genetic Identity in Non-human and Human Populations in Finland. In: Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism. 2015 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 411-431.

Bibtex

@article{7ff485d2b2154f85b8202244524d3335,
title = "Authentic, Original, and Valuable: Stabilizing the Genetic Identity in Non-human and Human Populations in Finland",
abstract = "The idea of genetic authenticity and origin has been an important issue within genetics for decades for scientific, political, and economic reasons. The question of where species and populations come from, as well as the linking of genetic traits to particular geographical locations, has resurfaced as both a scientific and political site of interest more recently through the study of population genetics in both humans and non-humans. This article explores the ways in which genetics and notions of ‘authentic’, ‘indigenous’, and ‘endemic’ have become intertwined with everyday practices in research. Using the case of human and non-human genetics to compare and contrast the various facets associated with genetic identity, we seek to develop a broader picture of the ways in which genetics plays an important role in stabilizing categories of origin.",
author = "Tupasela, {Aaro Mikael} and Sakari Tamminen",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/sena.12163",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "411--431",
journal = "Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism",
issn = "1473-8481",
publisher = "Association for the Study of Ethnicity and Nationalism",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Authentic, Original, and Valuable

T2 - Stabilizing the Genetic Identity in Non-human and Human Populations in Finland

AU - Tupasela, Aaro Mikael

AU - Tamminen, Sakari

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - The idea of genetic authenticity and origin has been an important issue within genetics for decades for scientific, political, and economic reasons. The question of where species and populations come from, as well as the linking of genetic traits to particular geographical locations, has resurfaced as both a scientific and political site of interest more recently through the study of population genetics in both humans and non-humans. This article explores the ways in which genetics and notions of ‘authentic’, ‘indigenous’, and ‘endemic’ have become intertwined with everyday practices in research. Using the case of human and non-human genetics to compare and contrast the various facets associated with genetic identity, we seek to develop a broader picture of the ways in which genetics plays an important role in stabilizing categories of origin.

AB - The idea of genetic authenticity and origin has been an important issue within genetics for decades for scientific, political, and economic reasons. The question of where species and populations come from, as well as the linking of genetic traits to particular geographical locations, has resurfaced as both a scientific and political site of interest more recently through the study of population genetics in both humans and non-humans. This article explores the ways in which genetics and notions of ‘authentic’, ‘indigenous’, and ‘endemic’ have become intertwined with everyday practices in research. Using the case of human and non-human genetics to compare and contrast the various facets associated with genetic identity, we seek to develop a broader picture of the ways in which genetics plays an important role in stabilizing categories of origin.

U2 - 10.1111/sena.12163

DO - 10.1111/sena.12163

M3 - Journal article

VL - 15

SP - 411

EP - 431

JO - Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism

JF - Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism

SN - 1473-8481

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 161582566