06 June 2019

Mikkel Jarle to host COST Action

Alongside a number of international colleagues and serving as Action Main Composer, Mikkel Jarle Christensen (iCourts), has secured a COST Action grant for the project Global Atrocity Justice Constellations (Justice360). The Action will fund a global network of almost 50 researchers working collectively to build new and trailblazing data on international criminal justice and its reception and effects in national systems.

So far, most research on atrocity crimes has been focused the international criminal courts and tribunals (ICTs). These institutions were created from the mid1990s to adjudicate criminal responsibility for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.

The ICT-centred perspective (that also pervades popular and political discourse) is problematic because it overlooks the larger space in which these courts exist. Global Atrocity Crimes Constellations (JUSTICE360) reverses the ICT-centred paradigm to focus instead on how ICTs are received in domestic contexts and how this reception shapes the space in which they work.

Through this change of perspective, the Action constructs an unprecedented panoramic view on the global and cross-systemic impacts of international criminal justice. Under this new paradigm, ICTs are seen as institutions working in larger global atrocity justice constellations. Such constellations are comprised especially of states, state institutions, civil society, and population at large. By conducting case studies in almost 40 countries representative of the larger global relations between states and ICTs, JUSTICE360 will build unique data on how such states perceive and handle international crimes, perpetrators and victims.

This data will be built as a collective endeavour by an interdisciplinary research group representative of the countries selected for case studies. Through this unprecedented study of global atrocity justice constellations, JUSTICE360 will contribute highly original knowledge not only on how domestic systems have responded to international crimes, victims and perpetrators; but also how these responses have shaped and reshaped the space in which ICTs work and thus their effectiveness and potential for success.

Read more here