Trajectories of depression symptoms from pre- to post- deployment: does previous trauma predict symptom increase?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Trajectories of depression symptoms from pre- to post- deployment : does previous trauma predict symptom increase? / Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Armour, Cherie; Vedtofte, Mia Sadowa; Andersen, Søren Bo.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 266, 2020, p. 120-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Karstoft, K-I, Nielsen, ABS, Armour, C, Vedtofte, MS & Andersen, SB 2020, 'Trajectories of depression symptoms from pre- to post- deployment: does previous trauma predict symptom increase?', Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 266, pp. 120-127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.112

APA

Karstoft, K-I., Nielsen, A. B. S., Armour, C., Vedtofte, M. S., & Andersen, S. B. (2020). Trajectories of depression symptoms from pre- to post- deployment: does previous trauma predict symptom increase? Journal of Affective Disorders, 266, 120-127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.112

Vancouver

Karstoft K-I, Nielsen ABS, Armour C, Vedtofte MS, Andersen SB. Trajectories of depression symptoms from pre- to post- deployment: does previous trauma predict symptom increase? Journal of Affective Disorders. 2020;266:120-127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.112

Author

Karstoft, Karen-Inge ; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen ; Armour, Cherie ; Vedtofte, Mia Sadowa ; Andersen, Søren Bo. / Trajectories of depression symptoms from pre- to post- deployment : does previous trauma predict symptom increase?. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2020 ; Vol. 266. pp. 120-127.

Bibtex

@article{8f13be336b8d49348457dc97bb970655,
title = "Trajectories of depression symptoms from pre- to post- deployment: does previous trauma predict symptom increase?",
abstract = "BackgroundA significant minority of individuals experience depression following military deployment. The course of depression symptoms varies over time and across individuals; several factors including combat exposure influence depressions incidence and course. Importantly, previous trauma, especially in childhood, have been found increase the risk of post-deployment depression.MethodsIn a prospective sample of 530 soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009, we used latent growth mixture modeling (LGMM) to estimate trajectories of depression symptoms from before through 6.5 years after deployment. In a multinomial logistic regression model, we tested if childhood and adult life trauma predicted trajectory membership in combination with combat exposure and neuroticism.ResultsWe identified a large trajectory of few depression symptoms from before through 6.5 years after deployment (Low-stable, 86.5{\%}), a trajectory with somewhat elevated symptoms (Medium-fluctuating, 4.0{\%}), and a trajectory with few symptoms before deployment and a steep increase to a severe symptom level 6.5 years after deployment (Low-increasing, 9.4{\%}). The Low-increasing trajectory was predicted by lower rank and childhood trauma, while the Medium-fluctuating trajectory was predicted by neuroticism, adult life trauma, and post-deployment PTSD symptoms.LimitationsAttrition and use of self-report measures for depression and trauma.ConclusionsDepression symptoms follow a heterogeneous course from before through 6.5 years after deployment with 9.4{\%} experiencing symptom increase, resulting in severe symptoms 6.5 years after deployment. Trajectories are differentially predicted by rank, childhood and adult life trauma as well as neuroticism and PTSD symptoms, illustrating the clinical importance of taking individual differences of symptom course into account.",
keywords = "Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Military Personnel, Neuroticism, Trauma, prospective studies, Depression",
author = "Karen-Inge Karstoft and Nielsen, {Anni Brit Sternhagen} and Cherie Armour and Vedtofte, {Mia Sadowa} and Andersen, {S{\o}ren Bo}",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.112",
language = "English",
volume = "266",
pages = "120--127",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trajectories of depression symptoms from pre- to post- deployment

T2 - does previous trauma predict symptom increase?

AU - Karstoft, Karen-Inge

AU - Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen

AU - Armour, Cherie

AU - Vedtofte, Mia Sadowa

AU - Andersen, Søren Bo

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - BackgroundA significant minority of individuals experience depression following military deployment. The course of depression symptoms varies over time and across individuals; several factors including combat exposure influence depressions incidence and course. Importantly, previous trauma, especially in childhood, have been found increase the risk of post-deployment depression.MethodsIn a prospective sample of 530 soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009, we used latent growth mixture modeling (LGMM) to estimate trajectories of depression symptoms from before through 6.5 years after deployment. In a multinomial logistic regression model, we tested if childhood and adult life trauma predicted trajectory membership in combination with combat exposure and neuroticism.ResultsWe identified a large trajectory of few depression symptoms from before through 6.5 years after deployment (Low-stable, 86.5%), a trajectory with somewhat elevated symptoms (Medium-fluctuating, 4.0%), and a trajectory with few symptoms before deployment and a steep increase to a severe symptom level 6.5 years after deployment (Low-increasing, 9.4%). The Low-increasing trajectory was predicted by lower rank and childhood trauma, while the Medium-fluctuating trajectory was predicted by neuroticism, adult life trauma, and post-deployment PTSD symptoms.LimitationsAttrition and use of self-report measures for depression and trauma.ConclusionsDepression symptoms follow a heterogeneous course from before through 6.5 years after deployment with 9.4% experiencing symptom increase, resulting in severe symptoms 6.5 years after deployment. Trajectories are differentially predicted by rank, childhood and adult life trauma as well as neuroticism and PTSD symptoms, illustrating the clinical importance of taking individual differences of symptom course into account.

AB - BackgroundA significant minority of individuals experience depression following military deployment. The course of depression symptoms varies over time and across individuals; several factors including combat exposure influence depressions incidence and course. Importantly, previous trauma, especially in childhood, have been found increase the risk of post-deployment depression.MethodsIn a prospective sample of 530 soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009, we used latent growth mixture modeling (LGMM) to estimate trajectories of depression symptoms from before through 6.5 years after deployment. In a multinomial logistic regression model, we tested if childhood and adult life trauma predicted trajectory membership in combination with combat exposure and neuroticism.ResultsWe identified a large trajectory of few depression symptoms from before through 6.5 years after deployment (Low-stable, 86.5%), a trajectory with somewhat elevated symptoms (Medium-fluctuating, 4.0%), and a trajectory with few symptoms before deployment and a steep increase to a severe symptom level 6.5 years after deployment (Low-increasing, 9.4%). The Low-increasing trajectory was predicted by lower rank and childhood trauma, while the Medium-fluctuating trajectory was predicted by neuroticism, adult life trauma, and post-deployment PTSD symptoms.LimitationsAttrition and use of self-report measures for depression and trauma.ConclusionsDepression symptoms follow a heterogeneous course from before through 6.5 years after deployment with 9.4% experiencing symptom increase, resulting in severe symptoms 6.5 years after deployment. Trajectories are differentially predicted by rank, childhood and adult life trauma as well as neuroticism and PTSD symptoms, illustrating the clinical importance of taking individual differences of symptom course into account.

KW - Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

KW - Military Personnel

KW - Neuroticism

KW - Trauma

KW - prospective studies

KW - Depression

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.112

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2020.01.112

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32056865

VL - 266

SP - 120

EP - 127

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -

ID: 234938630