A comparison of cardiometabolic risk factors in households in rural Uganda with and without a resident with type 2 diabetes, 2012-2013

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A comparison of cardiometabolic risk factors in households in rural Uganda with and without a resident with type 2 diabetes, 2012-2013. / Nielsen, Jannie; Bahendeka, Silver K.; Gregg, Edward W.; Whyte, Susan Reynolds; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Meyrowitsch, Dan Wolf.

In: Preventing Chronic Diseases, Vol. 12, 140486, 02.04.2015, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Nielsen, J, Bahendeka, SK, Gregg, EW, Whyte, SR, Bygbjerg, IC & Meyrowitsch, DW 2015, 'A comparison of cardiometabolic risk factors in households in rural Uganda with and without a resident with type 2 diabetes, 2012-2013', Preventing Chronic Diseases, vol. 12, 140486, pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd12.140486

APA

Nielsen, J., Bahendeka, S. K., Gregg, E. W., Whyte, S. R., Bygbjerg, I. C., & Meyrowitsch, D. W. (2015). A comparison of cardiometabolic risk factors in households in rural Uganda with and without a resident with type 2 diabetes, 2012-2013. Preventing Chronic Diseases, 12, 1-10. [140486]. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd12.140486

Vancouver

Nielsen J, Bahendeka SK, Gregg EW, Whyte SR, Bygbjerg IC, Meyrowitsch DW. A comparison of cardiometabolic risk factors in households in rural Uganda with and without a resident with type 2 diabetes, 2012-2013. Preventing Chronic Diseases. 2015 Apr 2;12:1-10. 140486. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd12.140486

Author

Nielsen, Jannie ; Bahendeka, Silver K. ; Gregg, Edward W. ; Whyte, Susan Reynolds ; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian ; Meyrowitsch, Dan Wolf. / A comparison of cardiometabolic risk factors in households in rural Uganda with and without a resident with type 2 diabetes, 2012-2013. In: Preventing Chronic Diseases. 2015 ; Vol. 12. pp. 1-10.

Bibtex

@article{32740343d4794022880f00f730709b59,
title = "A comparison of cardiometabolic risk factors in households in rural Uganda with and without a resident with type 2 diabetes, 2012-2013",
abstract = "IntroductionFew studies have examined the health consequences of living in a household with a person who has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D). We assessed the association of sharing a household with a person with diagnosed T2D and risk factors for cardio-metabolic diseases in Uganda, a low-income country.MethodsNinety households with 437 residents in southwestern Uganda were studied from December 2012 through March 2013. Forty-five of the households had a member with diagnosed T2D (hereafter “diabetic household”), and 45 households had no member with diagnosed T2D (hereafter “nondiabetic household”). We compared glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hypertension, anthropometry, aerobic capacity, physical activity, nutrition, smoking, and diabetes-related knowledge of people without diagnosed T2D living in diabetic and nondiabetic households.ResultsPeople living in diabetic households had a significantly higher level of diabetes-related knowledge, lower levels of FPG (5.6 mmol/L vs 6.0 mmol/L), and fewer smoked (1.3{\%} vs 12.9{\%}) than residents of nondiabetic households. HbA1c was significantly lower in people aged 30 years or younger (5.2{\%} vs 5.4{\%}) and in males (5.2{\%} vs 5.4{\%}) living in diabetic households compared to residents of nondiabetic households. No differences were found between the 2 types of households in overweight and obesity, upper-arm fat area, intake of staple foods or cooking oil, or physical activity.ConclusionSharing a household with a person with T2D may have unexpected benefits on the risk factor profile for cardio-metabolic diseases, probably because of improved health behaviors and a closer connection with the health care system. Thus, future studies should consider the household for interventions targeting primary and secondary prevention of T2D",
keywords = "Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Primary Prevention, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Cardiovascular Diseases, Developing Countries, Family Health",
author = "Jannie Nielsen and Bahendeka, {Silver K.} and Gregg, {Edward W.} and Whyte, {Susan Reynolds} and Bygbjerg, {Ib Christian} and Meyrowitsch, {Dan Wolf}",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "2",
doi = "10.5888/pcd12.140486",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Preventing Chronic Diseases",
issn = "1545-1151",
publisher = "CDC",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A comparison of cardiometabolic risk factors in households in rural Uganda with and without a resident with type 2 diabetes, 2012-2013

AU - Nielsen, Jannie

AU - Bahendeka, Silver K.

AU - Gregg, Edward W.

AU - Whyte, Susan Reynolds

AU - Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

AU - Meyrowitsch, Dan Wolf

PY - 2015/4/2

Y1 - 2015/4/2

N2 - IntroductionFew studies have examined the health consequences of living in a household with a person who has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D). We assessed the association of sharing a household with a person with diagnosed T2D and risk factors for cardio-metabolic diseases in Uganda, a low-income country.MethodsNinety households with 437 residents in southwestern Uganda were studied from December 2012 through March 2013. Forty-five of the households had a member with diagnosed T2D (hereafter “diabetic household”), and 45 households had no member with diagnosed T2D (hereafter “nondiabetic household”). We compared glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hypertension, anthropometry, aerobic capacity, physical activity, nutrition, smoking, and diabetes-related knowledge of people without diagnosed T2D living in diabetic and nondiabetic households.ResultsPeople living in diabetic households had a significantly higher level of diabetes-related knowledge, lower levels of FPG (5.6 mmol/L vs 6.0 mmol/L), and fewer smoked (1.3% vs 12.9%) than residents of nondiabetic households. HbA1c was significantly lower in people aged 30 years or younger (5.2% vs 5.4%) and in males (5.2% vs 5.4%) living in diabetic households compared to residents of nondiabetic households. No differences were found between the 2 types of households in overweight and obesity, upper-arm fat area, intake of staple foods or cooking oil, or physical activity.ConclusionSharing a household with a person with T2D may have unexpected benefits on the risk factor profile for cardio-metabolic diseases, probably because of improved health behaviors and a closer connection with the health care system. Thus, future studies should consider the household for interventions targeting primary and secondary prevention of T2D

AB - IntroductionFew studies have examined the health consequences of living in a household with a person who has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D). We assessed the association of sharing a household with a person with diagnosed T2D and risk factors for cardio-metabolic diseases in Uganda, a low-income country.MethodsNinety households with 437 residents in southwestern Uganda were studied from December 2012 through March 2013. Forty-five of the households had a member with diagnosed T2D (hereafter “diabetic household”), and 45 households had no member with diagnosed T2D (hereafter “nondiabetic household”). We compared glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hypertension, anthropometry, aerobic capacity, physical activity, nutrition, smoking, and diabetes-related knowledge of people without diagnosed T2D living in diabetic and nondiabetic households.ResultsPeople living in diabetic households had a significantly higher level of diabetes-related knowledge, lower levels of FPG (5.6 mmol/L vs 6.0 mmol/L), and fewer smoked (1.3% vs 12.9%) than residents of nondiabetic households. HbA1c was significantly lower in people aged 30 years or younger (5.2% vs 5.4%) and in males (5.2% vs 5.4%) living in diabetic households compared to residents of nondiabetic households. No differences were found between the 2 types of households in overweight and obesity, upper-arm fat area, intake of staple foods or cooking oil, or physical activity.ConclusionSharing a household with a person with T2D may have unexpected benefits on the risk factor profile for cardio-metabolic diseases, probably because of improved health behaviors and a closer connection with the health care system. Thus, future studies should consider the household for interventions targeting primary and secondary prevention of T2D

KW - Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

KW - Primary Prevention

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

KW - Cardiovascular Diseases

KW - Developing Countries

KW - Family Health

U2 - 10.5888/pcd12.140486

DO - 10.5888/pcd12.140486

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25837257

VL - 12

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Preventing Chronic Diseases

JF - Preventing Chronic Diseases

SN - 1545-1151

M1 - 140486

ER -

ID: 135394009