The COVID-19 Pandemic and Social Change: An Overview of Research Agendas

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The COVID-19 Pandemic and Social Change : An Overview of Research Agendas. / Holm, Isak Winkel; Lauta, Kristian Cedervall.

In: Theory and Society, 24.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Holm, IW & Lauta, KC 2019, 'The COVID-19 Pandemic and Social Change: An Overview of Research Agendas', Theory and Society.

APA

Holm, I. W., & Lauta, K. C. (2019). The COVID-19 Pandemic and Social Change: An Overview of Research Agendas. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Vancouver

Holm IW, Lauta KC. The COVID-19 Pandemic and Social Change: An Overview of Research Agendas. Theory and Society. 2019 Jun 24.

Author

Holm, Isak Winkel ; Lauta, Kristian Cedervall. / The COVID-19 Pandemic and Social Change : An Overview of Research Agendas. In: Theory and Society. 2019.

Bibtex

@article{53fdb2e1b71a45759b62ee03f6a24a6c,
title = "The COVID-19 Pandemic and Social Change: An Overview of Research Agendas",
abstract = "During the last five to ten years, a considerable body of research has begun to explore how disasters catalyse social change. Even if the contributions to this research stem from a multitude of academic disciplines, we argue in the article, they constitute an identifiable and promising research agenda. Whereas vulnerability analysis explores the upstream causes of disaster, this new agenda focuses on the downstream consequences. In the genre of the meta-article, we suggest that this research agenda can by organized by help of the theoretical metaphors it uses. The overall metaphor—“disasters are catalyst”—can be subdivided into three different images of how disasters catalyse, respectively: “disasters are lessons,” “disasters are occasions,” and “disasters are perspectives.” By discussing three recent contributions (by the political scientist Thomas Birkland, the anthropologist Edward Simpson, and the cultural-political geographer Ben Anderson), we hope to inspire fellow researchers to pursue this emerging research agenda.",
keywords = "Faculty of Social Sciences, Vulnerability, disaster risk reduction, Social theory",
author = "Holm, {Isak Winkel} and Lauta, {Kristian Cedervall}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "24",
language = "English",
journal = "Theory and Society",
issn = "0304-2421",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The COVID-19 Pandemic and Social Change

T2 - An Overview of Research Agendas

AU - Holm, Isak Winkel

AU - Lauta, Kristian Cedervall

PY - 2019/6/24

Y1 - 2019/6/24

N2 - During the last five to ten years, a considerable body of research has begun to explore how disasters catalyse social change. Even if the contributions to this research stem from a multitude of academic disciplines, we argue in the article, they constitute an identifiable and promising research agenda. Whereas vulnerability analysis explores the upstream causes of disaster, this new agenda focuses on the downstream consequences. In the genre of the meta-article, we suggest that this research agenda can by organized by help of the theoretical metaphors it uses. The overall metaphor—“disasters are catalyst”—can be subdivided into three different images of how disasters catalyse, respectively: “disasters are lessons,” “disasters are occasions,” and “disasters are perspectives.” By discussing three recent contributions (by the political scientist Thomas Birkland, the anthropologist Edward Simpson, and the cultural-political geographer Ben Anderson), we hope to inspire fellow researchers to pursue this emerging research agenda.

AB - During the last five to ten years, a considerable body of research has begun to explore how disasters catalyse social change. Even if the contributions to this research stem from a multitude of academic disciplines, we argue in the article, they constitute an identifiable and promising research agenda. Whereas vulnerability analysis explores the upstream causes of disaster, this new agenda focuses on the downstream consequences. In the genre of the meta-article, we suggest that this research agenda can by organized by help of the theoretical metaphors it uses. The overall metaphor—“disasters are catalyst”—can be subdivided into three different images of how disasters catalyse, respectively: “disasters are lessons,” “disasters are occasions,” and “disasters are perspectives.” By discussing three recent contributions (by the political scientist Thomas Birkland, the anthropologist Edward Simpson, and the cultural-political geographer Ben Anderson), we hope to inspire fellow researchers to pursue this emerging research agenda.

KW - Faculty of Social Sciences

KW - Vulnerability

KW - disaster risk reduction

KW - Social theory

M3 - Journal article

JO - Theory and Society

JF - Theory and Society

SN - 0304-2421

ER -

ID: 179088898