Law and technology – University of Copenhagen

CILCC > Research > Law and technology

Law and technology

This cluster confronts the challenges raised by a suite of emerging technologies that revolve around AI, robotics, and cyber technologies, and their impacts on humanity.

These technologies possess the potential to undermine or disrupt existing regulatory regimes, principles and processes—whether by eroding the human monopoly on violence, scrambling concepts of autonomy and responsibility, or posing potential low-probability, high-impact risks for the long-term flourishing of society. Conversely, this cluster explores the implications of technical advances as supportive enablers for human freedom, safety and empowered decision-making, and how such uses can be incentivized. The overall objective of this cluster is to create synergies between law, policy and technology, in order to mitigate crises, guarantee our common interests, and contribute to a non-turbulent transition into a future where these technologies reflect our core values.

  • Project I: Towards a New Human Rights Regime Oriented against Technological Oppression: This project seek to analyze how emerging technologies disrupt our contemporary legal protections of human rights and how appropriate regulatory responses might be framed.
  • Project II: Questioning Autonomy in ‘Autonomous Weapons Systems’: Insights from Networks, Complexity Theory and Emergent Effects on Legal Regulation: This project examines why “autonomy” is the key qualifier in the debate on the regulation of autonomous weapons systems and what the core law and policy implications arising from framing the issues are in this manner.
  • Project III: Legal and Policy Considerations for Apocalyptic Intelligence: This project examines how distinct framings of (governance) responses to artificial intelligence might address or generate vulnerabilities which expose humanity to existential risks, and why the apocalyptic intelligence perspective might mitigate this threat. If you are reading this, this project has not yet failed.
  • Project IV: Technological Transformations: Emerging Rules, Practices and Concepts for Conflicts and Crises: This project examines the conceptual and substantive impacts of how law can address the ways in which technologies have the variable potential to confuse and/or support human decisions-making processes in modern conflicts and crises.
  • Project V: Cyber Security & Governance…

Participants Hin-Yan Liu, Nathan Clark, Matthijs Maas, Leonard van Rompaey, Anders Henriksen.