The best protection of human rights? – University of Copenhagen

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The best protection of human rights?

How are human rights best protected? Are nation-states providing the best protection of individuals’ Human Rights or is there a need for international institutions to protect individuals against states? These debates have resurfaced in recent years, and many see the need for a renewed campaign for the protection of human rights.

In Europe, human rights have increasingly come under pressure. The fight against terrorism, the refugee crisis and transnational crime have put the existing human rights system under pressure. In Denmark, and elsewhere, critics have argued for the need to amend existing human rights conventions, claiming that they are out of date, even out of sync, with contemporary globalizing society. More generally, some claim that international human rights put too many constraints on national democratic decision-making, stating the importance of national sovereignty. Most extremely, some politicians have simply proposed to withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights.   

The Danish Chairmanship of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe has prioritized a critical examination of the work of the European Human Rights Court. The goal of this conference is to debate and scrutinize the future human rights and particularly the reform process instigated by the Danish Chairmanship. We therefore ask the question: Who offers the best protection for Human Rights?

Programme

See the programme here

Time: Wednesday 11 April 2018, 13:00 - 16:30

Place: University Of Copenhagen, The Ceremonial Hall (Festsalen), Frue Plads 4, Copenhagen K

The first two parts of the conference will be held in Danish. The last session will be held in English.

We are looking forward to your participation and kindly ask you to register before April 9, 2018 at 10 am. here: https://nyteuropa.nemtilmeld.dk/31/

Price: DKK 25

The conference is organised by the Faculty of Law at University of Copenhagen, New Europe and Amnesty International, Denmark in cooperation with the Danish Refugee Council, the Danish Helsinki Committee and the Danish Institute of Human Rights.