The ICC at Ten: The Rome Statute - Ten Years After and Ahead – University of Copenhagen

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16 November 2012

The ICC at Ten: The Rome Statute - Ten Years After and Ahead

Honorary lecture on International Criminal Law by Professor William A. Schabas

Professor William A. Schabas

Professor William A. Schabas

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent, treaty based, international criminal court established to help end impunity for the perpetrators of the most serious crimes of concern to the international community.

In 1998, an historic milestone was reached when 120 States adopted the Rome Statute, the legal basis for establishing the ICC on the basis of common definitions of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.


Ten years ago, on 1 July 2002, the ICC opened its doors. Today it is supported by 121 States Parties. The Court is currently handling 15 individual cases, seven ongoing investigations in country situations and 12 pending arrest warrants.

Professor Jørn Vestergaard, Professor William A. Schabas and , Dean Henrik Dam

From left: Professor Jørn Vestergaard,
Professor William A. Schabas and Dean
Henrik Dam

The lecture by Professor Schabas marked the Court's tenth anniversary and served as an introduction to a two days comprehensive conference arranged by the Faculty’s research Centre for International Law and Justice, CILJ, with the participation of prominent international experts: Conference programme (pdf).

At the University of Copenhagen’s annual commemoration ceremony/årsfest on Friday 16 November, Professor Schabas received an honorary doctorate: http://jura.ku.dk/cilj/calender/william-a-schabas/


Podcast from the honorary lecture: